Category Archives: Personal

Linux CP Making a Backup of a file with a user defined suffix

I use this handy command so often that I’d forgotten to make a note of it here for everyone.

If you want to make a copy of a file with the same filename and a predetermined suffix of your choice then run this command replaceing the YYYYMMDD date with anything you want:

cp haproxy.cfg{,.20170209}

The above command copies haproxy.cfg into a file called haproxy.cfg.20170209
Anything after the comma can be changed as you wish.

Google+ For the Win!

Last month Google+ introduced Collections https://plus.google.com/collections/welcome
A devilishly simple way to group your posts by topic.

When you create a Collection you set the audience, so you can have private collections for posts on a topic to share with a particular audience, or you can have public collections that anyone can follow.

This is a brilliant move on Google’s part. Users can follow topic from a user, rather than every little thing they posts. It’s so simple to share with a collection too, so it’s a win for those posting the content.

Another win is that posts by content are so reader friendly that the take up on followers is very good.

Google+ is becoming my favourite place to post stuff to now, and a great place for a Global community instead of just posting stuff amongst your friends and family. The Internet is the world, not just the people you already know.

I hope more and more of you come round to Google+, and if you don’t, well you’ll be missing out but you won’t be missed, there’s a whole world of people out there.

Mike

Weekend Project: Battery Powered Sonos Play:1

Following this video guide and the step up booster converter from ebay below I’m going to make a Sonos Play:1 battery powered so I can enjoy some lovely music on the balcony over the summer.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/XL6009-DC-DC-Voltage-Step-Up-Boost-Converter-replace-LM2577-3-32v-input-UK-Fast-/400858208676

Cisco How To Find A MAC Address By IP

From a switch that the device is plugged directly into (otherwise you’ll get the MAC of the next hop) first ping the IP address to ensure it’s in your ARP cache, then view the ARP cache, like so
ping 192.168.1.1
show ip arp | i 192.168.1.1

The pipe i just ensures you only see the info you’re after. If you’re doing this on a switch with many devices it’s handy to pear it down to just what you need.